Jump to navigation. Almost every day, we hear of new apps developed for just about everything — from staying organized to finding pharmacies or restaurants while on the road. Some of these apps have proven to be especially helpful for people with brain injury. The phone can be used to remind you of an upcoming appointment or to take medication, or it can be used like a traditional paper notebook to keep all your addresses, telephone numbers, calendar items, lists, and ideas.

Spaced Retrieval Therapy. Pricing, availability, and features accurate as of the last update February 20th, Technology is always changing. New iterations of mobile devices and apps are constantly being released. Please share with us what apps have and haven't worked for you in the comment section below. Please remember, we are not able to give medical or legal advice. If you have medical concerns, please consult your doctor. All posted comments are the views and opinions of the poster only.

This is a great list. I am looking for an speaking calendar app for my android phone, that I can set up reminders mins ahead of appointments that I can "snooze" or shut off, that will synch with my google calendar. I get distracted easily and forget my appointments sometime, and I am sure it will become worse in my condition.

Thanks in advance. Kathy Moeller used to have a paper version of this incredible tool that she created - The Brain Book and now has a ipad with it on it. Wish there was an app for this! SinceI have an abrupt brain injury ABI. There was a delayed diagnosis untilyet I am blessed.

Life-Changing Apps for People with Brain Injury

How did this transformation take place? Truly, I'm grateful for this organization. As with today's curriculum, I learned about my post ABI issues, and immediately was taught compensatory skills. Thus my phone, and my iPad is my prosthetic brain. Also, it automatically adds in travel time; a failure on prior calendars.Following a stroke, the body needs time to heal, and recovery time depends on the symptoms and severity of the stroke.

We have identified the best apps to help stroke survivors with their recovery and rehabilitation. More thanindividuals in the United States have a stroke each year, and aroundof these people die from stroke.

For example, communication, concentration, memory, and executive function, as well as spatial awareness, are all cognitive functions that may be impacted by stroke.

Stroke can also trigger mental health issues such as anxiety and depressionas well as movement and coordination problems, paralysis, difficulties swallowing, visual impairment, and urinary incontinence and loss of bowel control.

The faster a person is treated after stroke, the more likely they are to recover from it. While some people recover quickly from stroke, others may need long-term support. Apps are available to help aid the stroke recovery process. They can help you or your loved one to track appointments and medications, provide language therapy, train the brain, and even lower some risk factors for future strokes. Android : Free. Cozi is a family organizer designed to keep track of multiple schedules.

The app can help caregivers to manage their schedules and is ideal if the person recovering from a stroke has several caregivers. Keep track of schedules with a shared color-coded calendar and set reminders for yourself or other family members so that medical appointments and medications are not missed. Shopping and to-do lists can also be shared with everyone in the family to ensure that you have everything you need from the grocery store. All items added to lists are viewable instantly in real-time.

Medisafe is the must-have pill reminder that makes sure that you never miss a dose of your medication or mistakenly double up due to not tracking your medications ever again. According to the app, mistakes with medicine use and dosage tracking result in 50 percent of individuals not taking medication as prescribed,hospital visits,deaths each year, and 44 in every prescriptions not being collected from the pharmacy. Whether you are taking one drug dose or multiple doses each day, it can be challenging to remember to take the right pill at the right time.

Medisafe takes the stress out of having to remember if you or your loved one took their medications correctly. Research has shown that increased activity in a brain region called the amygdala, which is involved in stress, is tied to a greater risk of stroke. Therefore, reducing stress while in recovery from stroke could reduce the risk of future strokes.

brain injury memory apps

The app provides guided meditations, breathing exercises, and yoga and acupressure videos to help you check in with your emotions. Working out three to five times per week reduces the likelihood of recurrent stroke by fivefold, according to a study published in the journal Neurology. If you are unsure of how to start an exercise routine after stroke, the 7 Minute Workout Challenge app could be the perfect app for you. The 7-minute workout is a research-backed exercise program that has become a hit internationally.

Scientists have put together 12 exercises to perform for 30 seconds each with a rest period of 10 seconds in-between. The exercise sequences are easy to do, require no equipment, and can be done anywhere. After stroke, it is common to experience a condition called aphasia, which affects your ability to understand what people are saying, find the right words, and read and write. Aphasia is often a symptom of the brain damage caused by stroke.

Language Therapy 4-in-1 is a scientifically proven speech therapy app that aims to improve speaking, listening, reading, and writing in those with aphasia. Get started by giving their free version, Language Therapy Litea try today.During Brain Injury Awareness Week, new research has emerged from Monash University showing that smartphone apps may actually help people with memory impairment from brain injuries, debunking earlier concerns that technology makes our brain's memory capacity worse.

Overview of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

Memory difficulties are common after acquired brain injuries such as a stroke. Everyday problems include forgetting appointments, names and details, losing track of conversations and misplacing personal items. Such apps can free their minds to focus on other things, without using up mental resources worrying about what needs to be remembered," Dr Wong said. Dr Wong said the finding required further analysis, but was not consistent with the idea that memory aids make our brains lazy.

For the stroke study, they surveyed 29 participants with stroke and 29 with no history of neurological conditions. The studies also showed that these apps can be useful, not only for people with memory impairments, but for the general population. Dr Wong said that in both studies, they found that the majority of people used smartphones for three main reasons: for communication, as a memory aid and for internet access.

This contrasted with those with no history of brain injury, who instead listed portability, convenience and access to the internet as the main benefits," Dr Wong said. The memory apps used most often by participants with TBI and stroke were calendars, alarms, contacts lists, reminder text messages, notes, cameras, and to-do lists.

These apps help the user remember appointments, tasks, details and locations without relying on their internal memory capacity. They also found, in general, relying on memory aids did not influence intrinsic memory ability; a result that was important in counteracting the fear expressed by some TBI and stroke survivors that using a memory aid may make their memory abilities worse, just like using a wheelchair may make leg muscles weaker.

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By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.Google Scholar. Traumatic brain injury TBI happens in an instant, and the effects can last a lifetime. Fortunately, through rehabilitation advances, most people with TBI can recover much of their communication and other cognitive functioning. No part of that recovery process is easy, but smartphone and tablet technology can make each step more efficient and accessible.

Here are more than 40 apps to help clinicians, patients, and families, from initial assessment through community reintegration. As patients emerge from coma, track positive signs of progress or disruptive behaviors with such apps as Behavior Tracker Pro for iOS or Behavior Status for Android. Encourage voice production after extubation using visual feedback apps such as Bla Bla Bla for iOS, which shows fun faces reacting to sound.

If patients are unable to speak, Phrase Board for iOS offers text-based options for expressing basic needs, and Verbally for iOS is an adjustable keyboard with word prediction and voice output. Some standouts for iOS include iMazing and Matrix Game for visual problem solving, Awesome Memory for short-term memory, Brain Challenge for an overall cognitive workout, and Skill Game for executive functioning. To target practical skills, iOS offers a number of apps, including MakeChange for counting money, DialSafe Pro for dialing and other programmed numbers, and Spaced Retrieval TherAppy for training customized memory targets.

There are apps to aid dysarthria and dysphagia, which frequently accompany TBI: Pocket Pairs for iOS helps patients practice producing words clearly in minimal pairs.

The Swallow Now timer for iOS discreetly cues users to swallow at regular intervals to avoid drooling when sensation is reduced. When natural recovery has slowed, compensatory tools, such as memory aids, may prove useful. Familiar sticky notes have also made their way to touch-screen devices via Sticky Notes for iOS and the Evernote allows users to combine notes, sounds, images, and websites in synced notebooks.

Across platforms, the built-in Maps app is helpful for plotting directions and showing current location to those who have lost their way.

Find Android apps by searching Google Play. Contact her at megan tactustherapy. Megan Sutton Google Scholar More articles by this author. Sections About Tools Add to favorites.

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brain injury memory apps

Close Figure Viewer. Previous Figure Next Figure.Dana Wong does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Smartphone apps allow us to outsource remembering appointments or upcoming tasks. In fact, these platforms can be useful, not only for people with memory impairments, but also the general population. Over two studies, we set out to explore the potential of smartphones as memory aids by investigating how people with traumatic brain injuries TBI or with stroke use them.

For the stroke study, we surveyed 29 participants with stroke and 29 with no history of neurological conditions. We found that memory apps like calendars can be helpful for people with brain injuries.

And while it was a small sample, we also found that for participants without brain injury, there was no relationship between memory app use and memory ability. This finding requires further analysis, but it is not consistent with the idea that memory aids make our brains lazy. Rather, such apps can free our minds to focus on other things, without using up mental resources worrying about what needs to be remembered.

Memory difficulties are common after acquired brain injuries such as a stroke. Everyday problems include forgetting appointments, names and details, losing track of conversations and misplacing personal items. Research on rehabilitation of memory after brain injury supports the use of compensatory strategies. These include internal or mental strategies such as mentally rehearsing a speech and external strategies, such as calendars, lists, notes, alarms and photos.

Traditionally, external memory aids have been in paper-based formats such as diaries and notes, which are bulky and easily lost. Research shows early technological aids such as pagers and Personal Digital Assistants were helpful in approving improving memory function, but unfamiliar and difficult to learn to use for many people with brain injury.

Smartphones have the potential to address the limitations of earlier devices. They are familiar to most people, at least in the developed world, and are highly portable. In both studies, we found that the majority of people both with and without brain injury used smartphones for three main reasons: for communication, as a memory aid and for internet access.

When asked about the biggest benefit of using a smartphone, users with TBI and stroke most often cited its helpfulness as a memory aid. This contrasted with those with no history of brain injury, who instead listed portability, convenience and access to the internet as the main benefits. The memory apps used most often by participants with TBI and stroke were calendars, alarms, contacts lists, reminder text messages, notes, cameras, and to-do lists.

These apps help the user remember appointments, tasks, details and locations without relying on their internal memory capacity. For people with TBI and those without any neurological conditions, there was no relationship between use of memory apps and performance on objective memory tests requiring recall of a list of words.

This suggests that relying on memory aids did not influence intrinsic memory ability. This result was important in counteracting the fear expressed by some TBI and stroke survivors that using a memory aid may make their memory abilities worse, just like using a wheelchair may make leg muscles weaker. Our results indicate that this idea does not apply to memory among our sample group — rather, using memory aids is helpful for people who struggle to remember things by supporting their injured brains without causing any further damage.

For stroke survivors, more frequent use of memory apps also seems to be associated with higher productivity, as measured by their engagement in work, study and volunteer activities.

This may mean that using smartphone memory apps enabled them to be more productive by supporting them to remember and organise tasks.Mobile apps are a great way to keep your brain injury recovery moving forward from the comfort of your own home.

There are literally hundreds of apps designed to help brain injury patients adapt to life after brain injury. These apps were designed to sharpen your mental skills through repetition of cognitive rehab exercises. We also included some speech therapy apps for those who want to improve their communication abilities too.

Speech-language pathologists designed this top-rated app to help patients regain speech, memory, and cognitive function. Spaced retrieval is one of the most effective ways to improve short-term memory, according to memory experts.

It involves memorizing a fact, then waiting one minute, then quizzing yourself, then waiting five minutes, etc.

As you quiz yourself at longer and longer intervals, you cement the information into your memory. This makes spaced retrieval an impractical method for brain injury patients. The only drawback is the app is almost always running in the background unless you shut it off, so it can drain your battery fairly quickly.

Elevate offers a wide range of games that have many real-world applications, such as learning how to calculate change or percentages.

Some of the games are especially helpful for brain injury patients. Brain Synch forces people to get creative and use both hemispheres of their brain! There are two modes to choose from. You can either challenge yourself and play against the clock or take things easy in Zen mode and go at your own pace. These apps were designed to help brain injury patients live more independently.

From organizing your to-do list to breaking tasks down into step-by-step instructions, these apps can be real life-savers for TBI survivors. This app was developed by an actual brain injury survivor who was frustrated by his inability to remember important information. Qcard is more than just a reminder app. It helps people with executive function and memory issues manage their lives in a simple and intuitive way. It even guides you through complex tasks such as doing laundry, cooking a meal, or following your morning routine.

Another planning app. CanPlan breaks virtually any task down into illustrated, easy-to-follow steps. Ideal for brain injury patients who struggle with reading comprehension.

For brain injury patients with hearing loss, this app will revolutionize your communication abilities by enabling you to use a phone again. RogerVoice uses voice recognition software to provide a real-time transcript of what the other person on the phone is saying. AccessNow is a crowdsourcing app that helps people determine the accessibility status of various locations.

Users rate and review places based on how accessible it is. AccessNow can help you with that! These apps will help patients keep track of all their medical information and prescriptions.Moderate to severe brain trauma changes a family in many unexpected ways.

Patients can display behavioral changes, personality differences, cognitive impairment, and many other issues that inhibit their self-care abilities and overall independence. A traumatic brain injury lawyer can provide insight and legal counsel to families and individuals that are affected by this circumstance.

brain injury memory apps

While patients receive their treatment, there are also additional resources available that can help during the recovery process. Some of them may help the patient improve functional skills, while others are supportive in nature—intended to make everyday life a little bit easier for families living with this complex disability.

Some brain injury patients have difficulty with memory and basic skills like color matching. For these patients, a modified version of Sudoku can be good exercise for the brain. ColorDoKu is based on the number matching game, but it features colors. This free app has a 9 X 9 grid. The goal is to fill in the squares so that each of the 3 X 3 sub-grids, rows, and columns all have different colors.

Dragon Dictation is a useful app for patients who have trouble with written communication, but do well with spoken communication. With the app, users can dictate notes to themselves to compensate for memory problems. The app also dictates text messages, emails, and social media updates.

Life-Changing Apps for People with Brain Injury

Emotional and behavioral issues are problematic for some families affected by traumatic brain injuries. Breathe2Relax is a free app that helps users learn about the many ways in which stress affects the body.

Users are guided through stress management techniques, including diaphragmatic breathing. The app intends to help users gain better anger control, mood stabilization, and anxiety management. It may be used in collaboration with a mental health counselor. You may have heard of the Luminosity website, which brands itself as a brain training program for people who wish to develop better mental acuity. Now, the website is available as an app to help patients improve their cognitive abilities.

The app provides daily brain workouts that stimulate five core cognitive skills. It also provides detailed reports of the results, letting users know which areas they should focus on improving. This app is currently only available for the iPad. It can help brain injury patients regain the ability to count change, which promotes independent living.

Users will get helpful information on ways of counting change that use the least amount of coins. If you or a loved one were in an accident and sustained serious brain trauma, call our law firm at to request a complimentary, zero-pressure case review with a Los Angeles brain injury attorney today. Brain Injury.


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